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Meet The X-37B: Space Force’s Secret Mission That Flew For 908 Days


Ready to go down the rabbit hole?

This is fascinating!

Buckle up, let’s dig in….

I’d like to introduce you to the X-37B, a secret “Space Plane” operated by the Space Force that recently concluded a continuous 908 days flying in “Space” — basically very low Earth orbit.

But it’s the times and dates and the mission behind it that is turning some heads.

Of course you won’t see much reporting about this in the MSM, but you can trust us to break it all down for you.

I want to go to my friend BrainStormJoe who does an excellent breakdown here.

I’m going to start with his Tweet threat to introduce you to some of the ideas, then I’ll take you to some other sources and videos.

Start here:

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And here:

How is Trump so confident in telling Karri that something good is going to happen. Something much bigger….?

Because they caught them all. Including the 2022 midterm thefts.

Space force had an aircraft up for 908 days. It’s called X-37B. It took off shortly before the 2020 election and landed just after the 2022 election.

Coincidence? Or do they have it all? Was the military the only way?

Read the rest of this thread. What we are watching is awesome.

What an amazing time to be alive.

It’s the timing that is so interesting to me….

It takes off May 2020, in time to be in place for the 2020 Presidential Elections.

Then it stays in the air for 908 days until just shortly after the 2022 Elections.

Look, I don’t know all the details, but the implication is obvious….

Did the “Good Guys” (Trump White Hats) via Space Force launch that bad boy and store all the evidence of the two stolen elections up there?

Place it up where no one can get to it?

Seems to make a lot of sense.

Is that EXACTLY why we got this video from President Trump?

Telling us quite clearly: “I caught them all!”  (….and I stored the evidence up in Space? Things that make you go “hmmmmm”):

Here is the New York Post, from May 2020;

More from the New York Post:

The newly-established Space Force blasted a secretive space plane into orbit from Florida Sunday for a mystery military mission.

The launch out of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station marked the sixth flight for the solar-powered X-37B craft — which is flown by remote control without a crew.

Riding atop an Atlas V rocket, the craft left from Space Launch Complex 41 at 9:14 a.m., following a one-day delay due to bad weather.

Officials won’t say why or how long it will remain in orbit, but the last mission lasted a record-breaking two years in space.

Jim Chilton, who is senior vice president for X-37B developer Boeing, noted that each mission has been progressively longer for the craft.

It is one of two of the Air Force’s winged space planes, which together have logged a combined 2,865 days in orbit as of Sunday.

“If you add up all the missions, just under eight years in orbit and 1 billion miles, so a lot of traveling by this machine,” Chilton said.

And from DefenseScoop:

The U.S. military’s mysterious, uncrewed and reusable spaceplane — the X-37B — landed at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida early Saturday morning after 908 days in orbit, marking the completion of its sixth mission since it was launched for the first time in 2010.

Few operational spaceplanes exist at this point, and the Pentagon has been tight-lipped regarding its own Boeing-built, X-37B robotic test vehicle over the years. Details about associated payloads are largely classified.

Though somewhat similar and often compared to NASA’s Space Shuttle — which is no longer in service — the X-37B is smaller and isn’t intended to carry humans. Equipped with a payload bay that is the size of a pickup truck, it is instead designed to enable unmanned, on-orbit experiments and technology demonstrations — and to return data and research objects back to scientists and engineers on Earth for deeper inspection and analysis.

During its latest, recently concluded mission, the Space Force’s X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle-6 (OTV-6) assisted multiple government-led studies, including for NASA, the Naval Research Laboratory and Air Force Academy. For the first time, it transported a service module attached to its rear “that allowed us to host more experiments than ever before,” Lt. Col. Joseph Fritschen, X-37B program director in the Department of the Air Force’s Rapid Capabilities Office, said in a statement.

“From what we know, this mission was significant because it is the longest ever for the X-37B and it carried the most payloads to orbit. But it is entirely possible there are other milestones achieved by this mission that the Space Force is not telling us about,” Todd Harrison, non-resident senior associate for the Aerospace Security Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and managing director of Metrea Strategic Insights, told DefenseScoop on Monday.

Christopher Stone, senior fellow for space studies at the Mitchell Institute’s Spacepower Advantage Research Center, told DefenseScoop on Monday that he’s “very excited to see this program continue under the leadership of the Space Force following its handoff from the Air Force.”

The Pentagon’s primary use for the X-37B seems to be moving experimental payloads into orbit to test new and emerging space technologies — at least that’s a conclusion that could be drawn “from what is publicly known,” Harrison told DefenseScoop.

The platform “appears to have significant propulsion capabilities, so it can change its orbit or, in theory, boost the orbit of other satellites,” he noted. Such technology could enable the military to move low-flying satellites to higher orbits so they stay aloft longer, effectively prolonging their usability.

“It is also possible that the X-37B may have some robotic capabilities that would allow it to perform repairs or upgrade satellites on orbit, like the Space Shuttle did for the Hubble Space Telescope, but this is just speculation,” Harrison said.

Last, from GeekWire:

The U.S. Space Force’s Boeing-built X-37B space plane today completed yet another record-setting mission, landing like an airplane at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida 908 days after it was launched.

This was the sixth mission in the hush-hush X-37B test program, and the first to fly with a ring-shaped service module on its tail. The service module, which was jettisoned before the reusable plane’s descent, accommodated an extra set of experimental payloads for NASA and the U.S. military. It’s built to be safely disposed of in the coming weeks.

Hours after the landing at 5:22 a.m. ET (2:22 a.m. PT), the Space Force declared the mission to be a success.

“The deliberate manner in which we conduct on-­orbit operations — to include the service module disposal — speaks to the United States’ commitment to safe and responsible space practices, particularly as the issue of growing orbital debris threatens to impact global space operations,” Air Force Secretary Frank Kendall said in a news release.

Past X-37B missions, dating back to 2010, were conducted under the auspices of the Air Force, and the space plane’s fuselage still bears “USAF” markings. This was the first mission carried out by the Space Force, which was created as a separate military branch within the Department of the Air Force in 2019.

This mission, launched on an Atlas 5 rocket in May 2020, bested the 780-day endurance record that was set for the X-37B program in 2019. It also carried a record number of hosted experiments.

The Space Force said one of the experments, the Naval Research Laboratory’s Photovoltaic Radiofrequency Antenna Module, successfully harnessed solar rays outside Earth’s atmosphere and aimed to transmit power to the ground in the form of microwave energy.

It’s all speculation at this point, but I think there’s something here….

Something BIG here.

What do you think?



 

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